Necessities for the trip to work

Necessities for the trip to work


lettherebedoodles:

A Whole New World…

(( So this week I decided to try something a little different. :) I saw some beautiful “race-bent” Disney a while ago and wanted to try it out, so here’s some of our ladies. :D (There wasn’t really any rhyme or reason to my choices, I just started fiddling with the images and these happened.) :P I’m going to go back to doing genderbent stuff, but I think I’ll do some of these every once in a while if you guys would like to see more. :) ))


flawlessspecter:

theeindian:

quantumbanana:

staringinto-the-deepblue:

I’M DYING

I AM CRYING

I JUST STARTED LAUGHING AND CLAPPING LIKE A SEAL

IN CASE YOU NEED TO **** ME BUT YOU CANT, I KNOW, I’VE TRIED.  

HE ****’D 80 PEOPLE IN 2 DAYS. 

(via thefaultinourserenity)


nightmare-everlasting:

My night and morning in a masterpost. I just needed this all together coz I need this whole thing saved if ever I need a quick laugh, albeit a guilty embarrassed one. Just.

Bonus: 

i am still so so so so so so so so so so sorry to thorgasmed and their compromised commute i wish you all the luck in the world and i’m really really really really sorry for my odd pride in this just.

So sorry.

Link to the fic: [x]


 

(via profriversongarchaeologist)


riannafinch:

freh-kled:

tarzanna:

Is this girl actually me

who is she someone help

This post went too hard


levanna:

vigilantespanties:

Fred Rogers Acceptance Speech - 1997

God wow.

The kind of person I strive to be. 

(via profriversongarchaeologist)


prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

(via profriversongarchaeologist)


yourmotherseyes:

The Vagenda Magazine asked their Twitter followers to tweet them edited headlines

This is my favourite thing at the moment

(via profriversongarchaeologist)


chewbaccas-cousin:

This show was the best thing ever 

(via profriversongarchaeologist)


andrewstuntpilot:

Shakespeare’s Deaths and Murders infographic, by Caitlin Griffin at Drown My Books.

This was sent to me this afternoon by my former English Lit. tutor. File under: classroom wall displays. 

(via awkward-aeries)